Female Disruptors: Dr Teresa Purzner of Cerebelly On The Three Things You Need To Shake Up Your Ind

Female Disruptors: Dr. Teresa Purzner of Cerebelly On The Three Things You Need To Shake Up Your Industry

It feels like more and more, we are defining ourselves by our differences rather than our shared challenges and opportunities. If I could inspire a movement, it would be to shift our perspective away from considering how the person beside you is a threat to your values and ambitions, and instead, towards how the person beside you can inspire / augment your vision/passion/interests and you, theirs.

As a part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Teresa Purzner.

Dr. Teresa Purzner is a mother of three, practicing neurosurgeon, developmental neurobiologist and the Co-Founder of Cerebelly. While studying at Stanford, Purzer led the development of a new treatment for the most common type of infant brain cancer which is currently in human clinical trial and through this, found that various regions of the brain grow and peak at different times — each having their own nutrient needs to give children the best possible start in life. In 2019, Purzner developed Cerebelly which is the first and only baby food brand on the market that combines up-to-date early childhood nutrition with developmental neuroscience to provide veggie-first, science backed food with brain-supporting superior ingredients. Purzner ensures that Cerebelly employs robust processes to ensure the highest possible quality for all its products, and is the first ever shelf-stable children’s food brand to receive The Clean Label Project Purity Award, an honor only bestowed after products are tested for over 400 contaminants and heavy metals and meet the organization’s highest standard. In addition to Purzner’s medical accolades, she has been recognized as a Bio-X and SIGF Fellow, as well as a SPARK Scholar. Watch Teresa Talk Here

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory”? What led you to this particular career path?

I’m an MD neurosurgeon with a PhD in developmental neurobiology, but I am first a mother of three. While doing my research at Stanford I had my own babies and realized there was a huge gap in the market when it came to providing specific nutrients during key windows of brain development. Not only did the foods on the healthiest grocery store shelves miss out on these nutrients, they were missing out on the basic nutrients a developing brain and body needs. So, I guess I decided to set out and change that with Cerebelly. I knew if I didn’t do that, there was a high likelihood of no one else doing it.

There aren’t a lot of practicing neurosurgeons that step aside from operating to start a business. And to be honest, there were many moments that I questioned what I was doing. But there is a greater good involved in being able to put out a superior product that is accessible to all that motivated me to push myself.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

I think there are three major ways Cerebelly is being disruptive — for the better! One, of course, is the brain-focused aspect. I wanted to build a brand that offers nutrition that grows with a child’s developing brain. There is not one other brand on the market today that offers that to parents — and it’s the single most important differentiator between us and the other brands available. A child’s brain develops in extraordinary amounts during the first 18 months, so it is critical to be able to provide the nutrients it needs to best support that growth and development.

Secondly, which I think is really big, is the fact Cerebelly’s products are all vegetable-based. The great majority of baby food out there, even if the pouch has spinach, kale, or another veggie on the front, actually only contains a small amount of vegetables. When shopping for my own children, I would see these pouches with big green leafy pictures of spinach on the front, but when I would flip the pouch and look at the ingredients, I would find that there was the equivalent of ONE calorie worth of spinach in there. That was alarming to me and not acceptable, so we made the decision to have all our pouches be veggie-first, always.

And then the third one is that Cerebelly goes above and beyond in every aspect of the development of our products. When I was at Stanford, I also developed a drug for kids with cancer, and that’s a very rigorous, extremely intense process… whether it’s brain surgery or drug-development or science, I approach things very rigorously and very thoroughly. So, with Cerebelly, I took that same sort of attitude and put it to baby food development. Things like heavy metals — I have a real problem with the fact that there are heavy metals in baby food. So, we made sure the soil in which our ingredients are grown are the right type of soil, that it’s organic and non-GMO… Our DHA, I wanted it to be a non-meat-based DHA and I wanted it to be water-extracted… Every aspect of it, we did it at 110%. And I think that is a very different way of approaching baby food in general, but a very normal way of approaching brain surgery. It’s this transparency that awarded us the Clean Label Project award for all our products, which is extremely exciting and something I am very proud of.

How are you and Cerebelly going to shake things up next?

Our mission as a company and as individuals, is to change the way we nourish our kids. The standards we have in this country are simply not good enough, and we are going to push and fight hard to change that. Because we know we can. And it’s time. I definitely want to keep growing with our “Cerebelly babies” because while the window for critical brain development is in the early years, the brain never stops growing. There are many, many ways for us to continue to support healthy cognitive development as your little ones grow. So be on the lookout for more delicious and nutritious options from us in the coming months and years!

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Haha I think when you’re this early, and growing, it’s hard to think of anything as a funny mistake — little bumps are more like the spice that helped make a more complex soup and big bumps aren’t so hilarious!! Here’s a funny little moment, I guess — occasionally (ok, often…) I will run out of time before an important call / interview and won’t have time to change into a proper outfit. Given that this happens more often than I’d proudly admit, I keep a scrub top beside my desk because while scrubs wear (and wash!) like pajamas, they are socially accepted as reasonable attire even in pretty serious situations. I’ve also found that people more readily excuse a somewhat disheveled appearance when paired with scrubs (score!). Once my 2-year old came bombarding into the room during one-such scrub-adorned call. I was stuck between a rock and hard place — let the kid disrupt the call, go off video during a critical moment, or get up and reveal my sweatpants. Since then, I keep a scrub top AND bottom beside my desk.

Who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

The most impressive leader I’ve met is Dr. Jim Rutka. He’s a pediatric neurosurgeon who’s loved by his patients, a phenomenal researcher and a luminary in organized neurosurgery, having led many of the neurosurgical societies and served as editor of the most prestigious neurosurgical journals. While the strength of his CV is undeniable, what actually stands out to me most is his humanity. Simply put — he’s a wonderful person with a really great family. Even as a medical student, he would take time to talk with me in the halls and as a resident he was always up to date with my researcher and family life. When I got home after having my first child there was a huge gift basket waiting for me — from Dr. Rutka! I was out of the country and living in a small house in the woods, but there it was when I walked up to the front door. I’m not sure how he does it — in part I think it’s that he leads with confidence, clarity and kindness — but overall, I don’t think he’s the kind of person that can be replicated. I’ll settle with just being grateful to have spent my formative years under his guidance.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

In short, no — I do not believe that being disruptive is always good. In fact, I think it’s often not good. Disruptive undertakings can create distractions, disorder or chaos in an otherwise stable, prolific environment. Occasionally, disruption can cause serious harm — I think we can all think of several recent examples where a significant change to normal protocol was not for the better.

Think of it from a brain surgeon’s perspective. If you have a problem with your brain, who do you want doing the operation? The surgeon who has done the same operation, the same way, with the same good results hundreds of times, or the surgeon who is going to think outside the box and get creative in the OR? Well, if you have a common disease with a well-established treatment protocol, you want the former. If you have a very rare disease that has no established protocol, you want the latter.

I feel this can be applied well beyond the OR. If you’re trying to do something unprecedented you probably need to be disruptive: a disease that has no cure, a colony on a new planet, a phone as a means of connecting to the world rather than just the person on the other end. Similarly, if there is a big gap between what we know and what we are doing, you need to be disruptive: a baby food that brings modern-day developmental neurobiology onto your child’s plate through a vegetable-first, adaptive meal-plan. Because no one has tried to do it at all, you are necessarily unprecedented and disruptive. But if you have no new information, no new technology, no unprecedented ambition — then maybe disruption is less helpful than a solid, meaningful improvement.

Just be honest with yourself when it comes to your motivations — are they egocentric (to make money or elevate yourself as a creative thinker) or is it because the situation really does call for innovation? If it’s the former, I suggest you simply take the time to find the latter.

In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges faced by ‘women disruptors’ that aren’t typically faced by their male counterparts?

I will start by saying that things are getting much better. There has been a tremendous change in environment from when I started medical training in 2004 until now. I am incredibly appreciative of the women before me (in neurosurgery and outside) — their courage and strength have made an enormous difference. Is there still a long way to go? Definitely. Am I still underestimated, spoken over, winked at and asked for bedpans by patients who think I’m their personal support worker and not their neurosurgeon — sure, almost every day. But I also believe that some of my greatest challenges — mainly related to being a parent and a surgeon — are becoming increasingly shared by all parents (fathers included).

Here’s a funny story. I’m often told “you’re too young to be a surgeon” and I’ll normally respond with a lighthearted “…it’s because I haven’t left the OR in 10 years, so I don’t get any sun”. Once though, while waiting for a coffee after a very long day of operating and over 30 hours without sleep, a man beside me very visibly looked me up and down then said, “so you’re a nurse?”. I responded, “I’m a doctor haha”. Normally it ends there, but this man would not be swayed and continued with “no way, you’re way too young to be a doctor”. Now normally here I’d simply stop responding, but it had been a very long day in the OR, over 30 hours without sleep and at least 18 without eating. So instead of saying nothing, I looked him right in the eye and said, “Old enough for three kids, two doctorates, two patents, a company, a drug trial and a dozen years of post-graduate training”. The barista grinned ear-to ear (she had seen me skirt around similar questions a zillion times). I smiled sweetly, wished him a good night, and went off to enjoy my coffee.

If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be?

It feels like more and more, we are defining ourselves by our differences rather than our shared challenges and opportunities. If I could inspire a movement, it would be to shift our perspective away from considering how the person beside you is a threat to your values and ambitions, and instead, towards how the person beside you can inspire / augment your vision/passion/interests and you, theirs.

From the start, my mission for Cerebelly has been to serve as a catalyst that elevates the standard of the entire baby food industry. I wanted to make a product so scientifically rigorous, superior and accessible that it became impossible to ignore. If another brand embarks on a similar mission with conviction and rigor, then I consider them allies. I am not competing with other brands — I’m competing against childhood obesity and the unacceptable, sugar-laden, nutritionally void offerings we have become accustomed to offering our children during their most vulnerable and influential years. When you compete against something real, then when you win it is meaningful.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Keep on keepin’ on” — In other words, just…. keep….showing…up. In my earlier years, winning often meant getting to the finish line first. Now I find, more and more, the winner is simply the last one to give up — the person who has that one extra idea, that one extra ounce of energy or conviction. There have been many days where I found it hard to keep going, to face, once again, a seemingly impossible problem or to push against an increasingly insurmountable inertia. Those days I forced myself to get out of bed and show up. Even if it means I just sit and stare at my computer, I still show up. Gradually, showing up becomes easier and more rewarding. Eventually you become excited to be there again. The key, though, is when you least want to show up — that’s when it’s the most important that you do.

How can our readers follow you online?

Cerebelly.com and on Instagram @eatcerebelly


Female Disruptors: Dr Teresa Purzner of Cerebelly On The Three Things You Need To Shake Up Your Ind was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Ashley Shutt of ARO Creative: “They Told Me It Was Impossible And I Did It Anyway”

Get comfortable with sacrifice — Nothing, and I do mean nothing, comes easy. Anything that is worth having is going to be hard and require sacrifice. Believe me, it’s worth it!

As a part of our series about “dreamers who ignored the naysayers and did what others said was impossible”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Ashley Shutt.

Ashley is the President and Co-Founder of ARO Creative Inc. With over seven years of agency experience, her background includes work in creative production, marketing strategy, and content for B2C and Fortune 500 companies. She has also implemented product brand strategies to assist the joint-venture of two Fortune 200 companies and produced content for Clorox, General Electric, Camelbak, Goodwill, and other major brands. Among her professional accomplishments, she has received a prestigious 40 Under 40 award, is featured in “Who’s Who In America, Top Professionals” and has received multiple, regional awards for entrepreneurship and business excellence in Tennessee.

Thank you so much for joining us! Our readers would love to ‘get to know you’ a bit better. Can you tell us your ‘backstory’?

I grew up a little bit of everywhere. Texas, Georgia, Southern California, North Carolina, and eventually landed in Tennessee, where I graduated from East Tennessee State University with a degree in Marketing.

From about the time I was 8 years old, I wanted to be a CEO when I grew up. People would ask “CEO of what?” to which I replied, “it doesn’t matter.” Looking back on that now I giggle to think what 8-year-old me naively believed a CEO was….I guess you could just say I’ve always had a determined attitude. Determined to get good grades, determined to make captain of my sports teams, and determined to be successful in life — whatever that looked like.

Are you working on any new or exciting projects now? How do you think that will help people?

Everyday is new and exciting in some capacity. Whether it’s signing a new client or designing the next Disney logo (we haven’t gotten that account just yet… but this article IS about dreamers….).

Since day one, we’ve made it our mission to support other entrepreneurs in their endeavors. Working with startups is both a passion, and a creative outlet for us because the future is wide-open for them. There’s no rules or perimeters to follow, no existing brand to work around. It’s full creative freedom to turn someone’s dream into a reality. And we love seeing the look on their face when we do.

In your opinion, what do you think makes your company or organization stand out from the crowd?

Being fearless in our ideas has created a market for us to stand apart from a part of the country that is typically more traditional. I think having a true passion for our work and our clients helps too! People can see through the egotistical agency jargon pretty easily. We hope to be a refreshing change from that.

Ok, thank you for that. I’d like to jump to the main focus of this interview. Has there ever been a time that someone told you something was impossible, but you did it anyway? Can you share the story with us? What was your idea? What was the reaction of the naysayers? And how did you overcome that?

I am a part of the 1%…. Less than 1% of advertising agencies are woman-owned — which is an impossible figure itself. Particularly daunting to a 20-something, first-time entrepreneur… in rural Tennessee, no less! Made even more impossible by the statement I can remember making for most of my adult life: “I would never start a company… it’s too risky.”

In truth, my biggest naysayer has always been the tiny voice in the back of my head listing all of the things that could go wrong. Wrong financially, relationally, personally, and intimidating figures like “less than 1%”. Trying to find my voice and fiercely pursue it was something that I wish I had learned earlier in life. But now we’re 4 years in to ARO and I have traveled more, laughed more, cried more, celebrated more, and been liberated more than I ever had when I listened to that little tiny voice. My best advice to overcome that? Just ignore it.

In the end, how were all the naysayers proven wrong? 🙂

I’ve never really been one to follow the crowd (or even the rules) when it comes to making decisions — always wondering what “could be” instead of what “might be.” My competitive nature makes me stubborn at times, which I suppose lends itself to my relentless pursuit of proving cliches, statistics, and naysayers wrong. Woman or not, I knew when I started ARO that there wouldn’t be any glass ceilings — statistical or otherwise — in my future anytime soon.

In the end, I proved myself wrong. And I think that’s the greatest victory a person can have. In 4 years, we have continually doubled our revenue, our client portfolio, and our national reach. The only voice I listen to now is that one that says “what else can we do.”

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I have been incredibly lucky to be surrounded by people who are much, much smarter than I am. The person who stands out the most is my business mentor and consultant — Heath Guinn. He’s a serial entrepreneur with master-level skills in connecting dots and accelerating startups. Without his guidance and belief in me, there would be no ARO.

In the same breath, my co-founder, Samantha Culbertson, has been an absolute rock and beacon of light through navigating the stormy waters of starting a business. Her mastery in the art of design continues to leave me (and our clients) speechless. She is everything you need in a best friend and a partner.

It must not have been easy to ignore all the naysayers. Did you have any experiences growing up that have contributed to building your resiliency? Can you share the story with us?

Resiliency is developed through failure. Everyone is resilient because everyone experiences failure. The key is how you allow your failures to shape you. There’s always a reason to give up. A bad childhood, poor choices, toxic circumstances…. I just chose to compete with mine and allowed them to make me stronger.

Every single person has to deal with failing at something. Be the one courageous enough to see every obstacle as an opportunity.

Based on your experience, can you share 5 strategies that people can use to harness the sense of tenacity and do what naysayers think is impossible? (Please share a story or an example for each)

Believe in yourself — everything else depends on this

Grow in silence — No one needs to have an opportunity to criticize what you’re doing. Be quiet about it.

Evaluate your circle — Pay attention to who claps when you win… keep those people and get rid of the rest

Get comfortable with sacrifice — Nothing, and I do mean nothing, comes easy. Anything that is worth having is going to be hard and require sacrifice. Believe me, it’s worth it!

SPEAK UP — If you don’t like something, say so. If you love something, say so. Your opinion is unique and important and valued. And if it’s not, have the courage to find something else (see #1 strategy).

What is your favorite quote or personal philosophy that relates to the concept of resilience?

“Whether you think you can, or you cannot… either way, you’re right” — Henry Ford

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good for the greatest number of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

Something that encourages bold creativity for the purpose of community impact or promoting ideals that change behaviors for the better. Marketing isn’t just for selling a product. If I could inspire a movement, it would definitely be a campaign for a greater acceptance for people and beliefs, and ideas. That would be awesome.

Can our readers follow you on social media?

Yes! You can follow me personally or ARO Creative Inc. Lots of good tidbits on both channels. We also have an “ARO Vlogs” channel on Youtube that I tend to neglect but am making a conscious effort not to! It shows behind the scenes of our creative adventures, travel, and general happenings.

Thank you for these great stories. We wish you only continued success!


Ashley Shutt of ARO Creative: “They Told Me It Was Impossible And I Did It Anyway” was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Gene Bruno of NutraScience Labs: 5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Can Dramatically Improve Your Wellbeing

Choose a “peace zone” in your home — My wife and I agreed that one room in our house (our bedroom) was a peace zone. No arguments, no stressful discussions, no political discussions, no negative discussions of any type are allowed there at any time. This is a great way to assure that you can always have a place of peace in your house. Of course, once in a while we have to remind each other if one of us forgets, but that’s okay too. Best idea ever!

As a part of my series about “5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Gene Bruno.

Gene Bruno, MS, MHS, RH(AHG) possesses 42 years of dietary supplement industry experience. With a Master’s degree in nutrition and a second Master’s degree in herbal medicine, he has a proven track record of formulating innovative, evidence-based dietary supplements. Mr. Bruno currently serves as both the Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs at Twinlab Consolidation Corporation and Professor of Nutraceutical Science at Huntington University of Health Sciences.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the story about how you first got involved in fitness and wellness?

Back in the 1950s (before I was born), my grandmother had cancer. At that time there was no radiation or chemotherapy, just surgery to cut out the tumor. She had surgery a few times, but the cancer kept growing back, so they told her she had 6 months to live, and that she should put her affairs in order. Instead, she sought the services of an M.D. named Max Gerson who had a therapy he was using with cancer patients, including detoxification, juicing, a healthy diet and supplementation. To make a long story short, my grandmother didn’t die from cancer. Instead, her tumors disappeared, and she got well. I was born in 1960 and had the pleasure of getting to know my grandmother. As I got older, I was fascinated with her story and decided I wanted to learn more about how nutrition and natural medicine could have a positive impact on health, fitness and wellness. That’s how I got into this business.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

That’s a tall order, considering I’ve been in the business for 42 years, but perhaps I’ll tell you about the first story that made me know I made the right decision. When I was in my early 20’s I was managing a vitamin store. A woman came in and told me that her grandmother was dying from canker sores. I was confused because, although inconvenient, canker sores aren’t lethal. However, the woman explained that her grandmother’s canker sores had existed for years and made it painful for her to eat and drink. As a result, she was getting thinner and weaker. After asking a few questions, I recommended a probiotic product and folic acid since both had been shown to help with canker sores in some cases. A month later the woman came back into the store and, to my surprise, gave me a big hug. She said that her grandmother’s canker sores were gone, she was eating and drinking normally again, and that I had saved her life. The emotional high I got from that experience made it clear to me that I wanted to do this for the rest of my life. I wanted to help people feel better through the use of dietary supplements.

Can you share a story with us about the most humorous mistake you made when you were first starting? What lesson or take-away did you learn from that?

When I was young, I was very enthusiastic about all of the science I was learning about dietary supplements, and I wanted to share that information with everyone. One day, a customer walked into the vitamin store where I was working and began browsing. She pointed to a bottle of the amino acid L-Phenylalanine on the shelf and asked, “What is that good for?” Excitedly I replied, “That’s the amino acid L-Phenylalanine. It’s converted in your body into norepinenphine and dopamine which are excitatory neurotransmitters which play multiple roles in the body including the modulation of cognitive function.” The customer looked at me like I had lobsters growing out of my ears. She clearly had not understood a single thing I had said. So I paused, and then said, “It’s a natural substance found in protein, and it helps you to feel more mentally alert.” That explanation resonated with her, and she actually bought the product. That incident made me realize that sharing my knowledge with a customer was meaningless if the customer didn’t walk away from the experience having learned something. Since then, I’ve always tried to make explain myself in a way that the layperson can understand.

Can you share with our readers a bit about why you are an authority in the fitness and wellness field? In your opinion, what is your unique contribution to the world of wellness?

I’ve had 42 years of experience working in the dietary supplement industry and academia. I have undergraduate and graduate degrees in nutrition, as well as a graduate diploma and second master’s degree in herbal medicine. I’m also a certified nutritionist, registered herbalist and professor of nutraceutical science at Huntington University of Health Sciences — where I have taught doctors, nurses and pharmacists about integrative healthcare. I don’t rest on my laurels, but rather spend several hours every month reading new scientific studies on nutraceuticals, nutrition and healthcare in order to stay current with the state of the science. I write extensively on these topics, as well as teach about them, and I’ve participated in quite a number of human clinical trials studying nutraceutical science, health and fitness. Over the years, I’ve formulated hundreds of evidence-based dietary supplements, including fitness, health and wellness products.

My unique contribution to the world of wellness includes my ability and experience in formulating, writing and teaching about dietary supplements and the role they can play in health, fitness and wellness. More specifically, I am an advocate of — and have spoken and written extensively about — using clinically relevant dosing in the formulation of dietary supplements. In other words, I think it is very important to develop formulas using nutraceuticals at the correct doses shown to be effective in human clinical research. For example, if a study shows that 300 mg of specific herbal extract is effective at improving memory, then that’s the amount that should be used in a formula — not 100 mg or 50 mg or 5 mg. Such ineffectual dosing is a practice called “fairy dusting”, meaning just adding a little bit of a nutraceutical in the assumption assuming that consumers won’t know the difference, and then still making claims that the product will have the desired effect. It’s great for profit margins, but terrible for product efficacy. I despise this deceptive practice and I make sure that it never happens with my formulations.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I little over 30 years ago, I went to work for Mel Rich, the president of Phoenix Laboratories, a contract manufacturer of dietary supplements based in New York. Mel appreciated my knowledge and enthusiasm and made it a point to support my educational endeavors, paying the tuition for both my graduate diploma and master’s degree in herbal medicine. Mel has since passed away and Phoenix Laboratories no longer exists, but I will always be grateful to him for helping me to further my knowledge base and educational credentials.

Ok thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. We all know that it’s important to eat more vegetables, eat less sugar, exercise more, and get better sleep etc. But while we know it intellectually, it’s often difficult to put it into practice and make it a part of our daily habits. In your opinion what are the 3 main blockages that prevent us from taking the information that we all know, and integrating it into our lives?

  1. Making excuses — There are always reasons not to do something that you know you should do. Don’t look for those reasons. Don’t accept those reasons. Instead, look for the reasons why you can do what you know you need to do. Make sure your attitude is consistent with your goals.
  2. Lack of scheduling — This is particularly a problem for exercise. Make sure to schedule time to exercise when you are most likely to do it. For me, that means first thing in the morning since I know that I have family obligations in the evening — but what ever time works for you to consistently do what you need to do.
  3. Not getting sufficient sleep — If you don’t get sufficient sleep you it will affect your performance, your energy, your motivation and your appetite. Don’t stay up too late! Get to bed at a reasonable hour and do it consistently every night.

Can you please share your “5 Non-Intuitive Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing”? (Please share a story or an example for each, and feel free to share ideas for mental, emotional and physical health.)

  1. Don’t run out of your supplements — I’m better at most in taking my supplements regularly, but sometimes I run out of one or more of my supplements and allow time to lapse before purchasing them again. Then my energy levels start declining and I feel tired and fatigued. That’s when I start to realize that I shouldn’t have run out of my supplements. As soon as I get my replacement supplements and start taking them again, I always feel better.
  2. Don’t go crazy on the weekends — While I think that its perfectly okay to deviate from your healthy diet a little bit on the weekends, don’t be excessive about it. If you decide that you’re going to eat anything you want on Saturday and Sunday, that means that 29% of the time your eating a poor diet. Instead, choose a single meal as your cheat meal, not every meal for two days. The same goes for drinking. You can have a couple of drinks and still enjoy yourself without drinking to excess and getting a hangover (and making your liver unhappy)
  3. Keep some balance in your life — When we get really busy professionally or personally, we tend to sacrifice something that we enjoy but consider non-essential. However, that thing that we really enjoy actually IS essential since it brings balance into our life. For me it was audiobooks. I just didn’t have time to listen to them, but decided it was important to make time. Then I figured out (duh) that I could listen to an audiobook during my 30-minute aerobic walk in the morning when I typically reviewed my emails on my phone. Making this change made me a happier person. Make time to bring balance into your life.
  4. Figure out how to eat more vegetables — Increasing our intake of vegetables is probably the single most important dietary practice we can adopt, but after a while you’ll get bored just eating salads. Search the internet for vegetable recipes that are easy to make and delicious to eat. If you do this one simple thing, it will change your life for the better.
  5. Choose a “peace zone” in your home — My wife and I agreed that one room in our house (our bedroom) was a peace zone. No arguments, no stressful discussions, no political discussions, no negative discussions of any type are allowed there at any time. This is a great way to assure that you can always have a place of peace in your house. Of course, once in a while we have to remind each other if one of us forgets, but that’s okay too. Best idea ever!

As an expert, this might be obvious to you, but I think it would be instructive to articulate this for the public. Aside from weight loss, what are 3 benefits of daily exercise? Can you explain?

  1. Improves mood — Exercise stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier, more relaxed and less anxious
  2. Improves overall health — Exercise can help prevent or manage various health problems including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and arthritis. In fact, swimming is the magic activity that effectively manages my wife’s osteoarthritis.
  3. Improves sex life — Regular exercise may enhance arousal for women and make men less likely to have issues with erectile dysfunction, compared to men who don’t exercise.

For someone who is looking to add exercise to their daily routine, which 3 exercises would you recommend that are absolutely critical?

  1. Some type of aerobic exercise — At its simplest, this can just be brisk walking. It can also be swimming, dancing and hiking, none of which require the use of exercise equipment — although you can certainly use a treadmill, stationary bike, etc.
  2. Lunge — This is a good compound exercise using muscles in your abdominals, back, gluteus, quadriceps, hamstrings and calves. However, older people may have difficulty with this exercise
  3. Pushup — This is another good compound exercise using muscle in your chest, shoulders, triceps and abdominals.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story?

Years ago the book Fit or Fat by Covert Bailey, PhD give me an excellent understanding about how exercise — especially aerobic exercise — has such a powerful impact on health and weight control. After reading that book. I begin integrating aerobic exercise (as brisk walking) into my daily life. Over the course of a year, I lost 75 lbs and felt so much better.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

If I could get everyone to start taking three dietary supplements, I’m certain that America would be a healthier nation. Here are the three supplements, along with my reason for choosing them:

  1. Multivitamin — According to the USDA, only 10% of Americans eat and good diet, and virtually everyone falls short of obtaining sufficient amounts of a few key vitamins and minerals. A good multivitamin provides a nutritional insurance policy, helping to assure adequate of several vital nutrients. If the multivitamin has a good dose in B vitamins, it will also tend to improve energy levels and help you handle your stress better.
  2. Vitamin D — Outright vitamin D deficiency is present in 41.6% of the U.S. population, while vitamin D insufficiency (i.e. lacking sufficient vitamin D) is present in 77% of the population. Considering vitamin D’s role in immune health, bone heath and several other areas of health and wellness, this is a big problem that could be vastly improved by the daily use of a supplement providing 2,000–5,000 IU (50–125 mcg) of vitamin D daily.
  3. Omega-3 fatty acids — While human beings evolved on a diet with approximately a 1:1 ratio of omega-6 (typically found in vegetable oils) to omega-3 fatty acids (typically found in fish), the current Western diet provides about a 16:1 ratio. This is a problem since omega-6 fatty acids tend to be pro-inflammatory while omega-3 fatty acids tend to be anti-inflammatory. Furthermore, Harvard School of Public Health study has indicated that omega-3 deficiency causes 96,000 U.S. deaths per year, so I recommend that everyone get at least 600 mg of omega-3 fatty acids daily.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

Professor Joseph Campbell write a book and did a PBS series called The Power of Myth. In it, he made this recommendation, “Follow your bliss.” He elaborated, saying:

“Follow your bliss. If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you can see that, you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss, and they open the doors to you. I say, follow your bliss and don’t be afraid, and doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be. If you follow your bliss, doors will open for you that wouldn’t have opened for anyone else.”

I have found this advice to be sound. I have followed it and it has worked for me.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this if we tag them 🙂

President Biden. I’d like to explain to him the important role that the right dietary supplements can play in the health and wellness of America.

What is the best way our readers can follow you online?

I do podcasts and write articles that appear on nutrasciencelabs.com.

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!


Gene Bruno of NutraScience Labs: 5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Can Dramatically Improve Your Wellbeing was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Maggie Colette of Think Like A Boss: Five Ways To Leverage Instagram To Dramatically Improve Your…

Maggie Colette of Think Like A Boss: Five Ways To Leverage Instagram To Dramatically Improve Your Business

Really get to know and connect with your audience — people buy from people and if you want to cultivate a community of raving fans who buy from you, putting the work in from the beginning (to really get to know who is following you and what their biggest struggles are) will pay off in the long run.

As a part of our series about How To Leverage Instagram To Grow Your Business, I had the pleasure of interviewing Maggie Colette.

Maggie Colette is one of the world’s leading, self-taught Instagram® strategists and coaches, counting Khloe Kardashian as a superfan. Her mission is to empower women everywhere to follow their dreams and develop out of this world self-belief through her business Think Like A Boss.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

It was July 2015 and I’d just boarded a flight from London Heathrow to Mexico City. Midway through the flight, I started to feel unwell. I got up to go to the bathroom and passed out in the galley. The next thing I know, my legs are in the air and the air stewards are peering down at me trying to bring me round.

This incident was a stark warning of what can happen when you work in a highly pressurised role and combine it with working long hours and continuous long haul travel.

This was burnout at its worst and it was also the starting point that got me questioning what on earth I was doing with my life.

I’d accidentally fallen into my role in banking, but I didn’t question it until 10 years later, when I wondered, why on earth I was still here when I didn’t even like my job?!

This carried on for another 12 months until I received one final warning from the doctor. Carry on with this lifestyle and be at risk of a heart attack at the age of 35 OR quit now and do something entirely different with my life.

I chose the latter.

So, in 2016 I hired my first ever business coach, made a plan and a few months later I quit to travel the world for 6 months, before starting my online business.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started this career?

Great question! There’s one experience that really stands out to me from when I was in LA in September 2019. I and was sitting at the hotel bar waiting for my dinner to arrive when a guy came over. The first thing he did was to ask the barman for an ice bucket (because his girlfriend had just had a panic attack and he wanted ice to help calm her down), then he turned to me and thanked me.

His exact words were “I hope you don’t mind and I know you don’t know me, but I just want to say thank you for your service to the world. I’m an energy healer and I could feel your positive and magical energy from the other side of the bar when I was having dinner with my girlfriend earlier. You are impacting more lives than you could possibly imagine and I really wanted to tell you that. Would you mind if I gave you a hug?”

Not knowing what to do or say, I somehow found myself nodding along and before I knew it, we were hugging it out! I think the barman thought we were mad, although it was LA and in LA anything goes!

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

The first time I ever did a Facebook LIVE as a business owner I wore a suit. Working in banking for 10 years apparently took its toll on my wardrobe 😂.

On a more serious note, I had it in my head that I wouldn’t be taken seriously if I wasn’t wearing a suit. Thankfully that thought process was short lived. After I came off that LIVE I cringed. Not only was I sweating profusely from the nerves, but I came across as ridiculous!

Everytime, I look back on that story, it leaves me in fits of giggles.

I did however, learn a very important lesson, which is that it’s okay to be me. In fact it’s necessary to be you. Don’t pretend to be someone you’re not otherwise people will see right through you.

I used to hate wearing suits in my corporate role. There were times where I was told to dull down my sparkle and because of that, I’ll admit to losing myself for a few years and blending into the background.

The beauty of business however, is that you get to create your rules and you get to do things your way. Be who you are, not who the world wants you to be!

Ok. Let’s now move to the main focus of our discussion. For the benefit of our readers, can you explain why you are an authority about Social Media Marketing?

Until 18 months ago I found social media frustrating. Sure, it was fun to post and to go live, but I couldn’t for the life of me, make social media work for me. I felt like the algorithm was against me and I also really struggled to find clients.

I knew that social media could be incredible for your business (if used the right way).

I’d also heard people talk about the positive impact that creating viral content could have for your brand, but I didn’t know anyone in my network who was really nailing social media, so I decided to teach myself.

I then spent a good 12 months teaching myself, through independent testing and trial and error, understanding what makes platforms like Instagram® tick, what it takes to create viral content and how this can then grow your brand.

Fast forward to today and I’ve grown my community from 6k to 60K in 12 months. I’ve 10x the size of my mailing list, I’ve 4x my revenue, I’ve helped clients bring in in excess of $750k in revenue (during a global pandemic!) and I’m also regularly regrammed by global celebrities like Khloe Kardashian.

I now use what I’ve learned to teach other entrepreneurs how to grow their businesses through social media.

Which social media platform have you found to be most effective to use to increase business revenues? Can you share a story from your experience?

Instagram® is my go-to and preferred platform. It’s fun. It’s educational and you can be as creative as you like.

My favourite story is having a new found fan in the form of Khloe Kardashian. She first came across my account in November 2020 and has been regularly sharing my content ever since.

One thing I love to highlight to my community through this experience, is that there is no limit to what you can do on this platform OR who you can impact, if you know what you’re doing.

If the Kardashians can find me through creating epic content, then your idols can sure as heck find you too.

Plus there are so many benefits to growing an online business through social media. Instagram® is an incredible platform for increasing brand awareness, building your confidence through getting visible, growing your audience and building your authority and credibility.

Let’s talk about Instagram specifically, now. Can you share five ways to leverage Instagram to dramatically improve your business? Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Really get to know and connect with your audience — people buy from people and if you want to cultivate a community of raving fans who buy from you, putting the work in from the beginning (to really get to know who is following you and what their biggest struggles are) will pay off in the long run.
  2. Show up on Instagram® Stories daily. These are a little bit like Big Brother watching you, the only difference being that you get to see who is watching your content and you can get super strategic about what you share! People who watch your stories are emotionally invested in you. They watch you because they feel a connection with you. Also the more consistently you show up, the more you will be remembered, and the more powerful the bond your community will feel with you.
  3. Get curious and ask your audience questions every single day. Remember, people want to feel special. When you ask your community what their struggles are or how they are feeling today. It makes them feel like you care. Also, the more you invite conversation, the more engaged and connected your audience will feel to you.
  4. If you’re not already using Instagram® Reels, you are really missing out. I’ve lost count of the number of times clients have messaged me to say their reels have gone viral and they’ve hit the Instagram® Explore page. Instagram® is really boosting reels right now and everyone loves video marketing. If you’re looking to go viral quickly, using Reels is the quickest and easiest way to capture people’s attention.
  5. Leave five new Instagram® voice notes each day, Monday to Friday. If you do that every day for a month that’s at least 100 new connections a month. Imagine if between 1% — 10% of your new connections bought from you each month, what would that do to your revenue? Instagram® DMs is where it’s at if you’re serious about monetizing your Instagram® account. Also, it takes people on average 21 touch points before they buy from you. The sooner you start having real conversations, the sooner you’ll make sales

Because of the position that you are in, you are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

One movement I would love to inspire is making mindset and self-belief a subject that is taught at school from a very young age. In the same way that kids are taught maths and english as mandatory subjects, mindset and self-belief should be taught as mandatory subjects too.

It saddens me to see, so many incredible women and men doubt themselves as adults. I see it every day online. This is largely why I created Think Like a Boss — to empower entrepreneurs to believe in themselves.

If mindset was a subject that was taught as part of our education and taught at schools from an early age, the world would be a happier, confident and more empowering place to be.

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this if we tag them 🙂

I would have to say Oprah Winfrey.

She is real, raw, committed to making a difference and is as inspirational as they get.

Everything she’s been through and everything she’s achieved thus far in her life is simply mind blowing.

I also love how she’s done it all — talk show host, actress, philanthropist, author… there is nothing this lady has not done and she continues to pursue what sets her soul on fire. Oprah, if you’re reading this…call me 🙂

Thank you so much for these great insights. This was very enlightening!


Maggie Colette of Think Like A Boss: Five Ways To Leverage Instagram To Dramatically Improve Your… was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Dr. Marcus Duda: 5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Can Dramatically Improve Your Wellbeing

Strengthening your fascia, incorporating diet changes slowly, decreased caffeine and wearing Vive Wear socks are all simple changes that can improve an individuals health, energy, balance, strength, and mental acuity. You may have just accomplished a complete health makeover without even noticing it.

As a part of my series about “5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Marcus V. Duda MD

Dr. Marcus Duda sees patients as a general orthopedic surgeon with a subspecialty in the care and treatment of the foot and ankle, including lower extremity wound care in Greensboro, North Carolina. He has a special interest in foot and ankle surgery, as well as diabetic foot care and complex wounds of the lower extremities. He has been in practice for more than 20 years.

He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery and active member of the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society, as well as the Wound Healing Society (WHS) and the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC).

Dr. Duda is Board Certified by the American Board Orthopedic Surgery.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the story about how you first got involved in fitness and wellness?

I am an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in treatment of the foot and ankle and lower extremity wound care. I played football in college and always had access to state of the art training, conditioning and nutrition. I thought I had it all figured out about maintaining excellent health until my father died of a heart attack at age 66 while jogging around a track. He seemed very healthy with regular exercise and what was thought a good diet. I decided to see a cardiologist to see if I was at risk for a heart attack. Laboratory tests showed I had high cholesterol, high triglycerides and high blood pressure. Bummer, I wasn’t doing very well. I started taking medicines for these problems and was unable to completely correct my medical conditions with prescription drugs. I felt I couldn’t exercise more, so my only option was to change my diet. I started changing to a plant based diet, focused on cruciferous vegetables, and started to have significant improvement in my cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure. I now understand that most medical conditions can be improved by diet and this change isn’t easy.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

My first day of my orthopedic residency was quite interesting. I started my first day of residency on call for trauma. A patient was brought into the ICU after being hit by a cauldron of molten metal. He was covered in soot and looked like a homeless person. I stayed up around the clock to keep him alive. Placing central lines and transfusing blood products and medicine. He started to look pretty good and I was proud of my efforts. Then he started developing sepsis and was crashing quickly. I asked the attending surgeon if I could start antibiotics. He said not to start antibiotics or any other invasive treatments. As soon as the attending surgeon left the ICU I asked the nurse for a lumbar puncture tray, and I performed my first lumbar puncture. I sent the spinal fluid for cultures. Later that day the cultures showed a bacterial meningitis and I started an IV antibiotic based on the culture sensitivity. That afternoon on rounds I presented my treatment and reviewed the clinical findings of the patient’s rapid improvement. The attending surgeon was quite upset that that my treatment went against his explicit orders. I agreed but pointed out that my treatment was the right thing to do. He agreed and we moved on to the next patient on rounds. Twenty years later while working as an attending surgeon in another town I was working with a nurse who said, “you don’t remember me, do you?” She’s the patient’s wife that I treated 20 years ago and her daughter just gave me my Covid vaccine. My simple take home message is to work hard and do the right thing even if you are told otherwise. It might some day have an important impact on someone’s life.

Can you share a story with us about the most humorous mistake you made when you were first starting? What lesson or take-away did you learn from that?

My most humorous mistake was the first patient I treated with the Vive Wear sock. The patient was septic in the hospital and two surgeons recommended amputating her ulcerative and infected legs. She wanted to try the Vive Wear sock instead of having her legs amputated. Every day I came by and put on new socks and her legs started to improve. She was discharged to a skilled nursing facility and was brought to my office for her first office visit. Her legs looked terrible, I thought I had to start over with a new sock design. I told the wound care nurse who accompanied her that I felt terrible that my sock wasn’t working. The nurse told me she had gone back to traditional wound care dressings and she stopped using the Vive Wear sock. The nurse left with a better understanding of the Vive Wear sock and the patient returned with two healed legs. The humor was that I almost started in developing a new sock. Fortunately, the wound care nurse came to the office visit with the patient and explained that she hadn’t been using the Vive Wear sock.

Can you share with our readers a bit about why you are an authority in the fitness and wellness field? In your opinion, what is your unique contribution to the world of wellness?

When I started my career in orthopedic surgery I volunteered at a diabetic foot clinic. Taking care of foot and leg ulcers was challenging since wound care was not a focus of medical school or orthopedic surgical residency. While studying treatment options for these lower extremity problems I realized there may be a new innovative way to keep legs and feet healthy. After years of research and development I created Vive Wear compression socks. During clinical trials patients commented on how comfortable and energized their legs felt. The patented Vive Wear sock is made of baby alpaca and merino wool that is not only soft and comfortable but the natural fibers keep your legs comfortable in both hot and cold weather. Combined with the natural fiber is graduated compression that can improve circulation in the legs up to 40%. Engineered nano silver and nano copper was added to create a micro current that not only energizes your legs but also minimized that stinky sock odor. The silver was bound to the alpaca and merino wool so it would not wash out of the sock. Studies at a University demonstrated that the silver would not wash out of the sock after washing in soap and water. The sock has been very popular with endurance athletes, workers on their feet all day long, and people trapped at home during this pandemic.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I enjoy the mountains and train so I can hike, climb or ski in the backcountry. I wasn’t able to achieve success in my training until I started listening to a very focused and motivated guide. On one expedition while climbing in the Tetons I mentioned to my guide, Zahan Billimoria, that my endurance didn’t seem strong. Zahan told me my endurance was good but my strength was lacking. I was shocked at his observation but was determined to undertake a new approach to athletic strength training. Zahan’s focus on strength training is based on body weight training to develop fascial strengthening. The fundamentals of fascial integration isn’t in any of my medical books or orthopedic training but delivers impressive improvement in athleticism.

Ok thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. We all know that it’s important to eat more vegetables, eat less sugar, exercise more, and get better sleep etc. But while we know it intellectually, it’s often difficult to put it into practice and make it a part of our daily habits. In your opinion what are the 3 main blockages that prevent us from taking the information that we all know, and integrating it into our lives?

The three biggest problems in our diet are carbohydrates, animal fats and caffeinated drinks. Carbohydrates are converted to sugar very quickly in our body and create rapid spikes in our sugar level. This sugar level then rapidly falls and we become hungry again very quickly, craving more carbohydrates. The animal fats cause plaques in our arteries and associated circulatory problems. The secondary benefit of minimizing carbohydrates is that it forces our body to burn a higher percentage of fat which is a more efficient fuel, particularly for endurance athletes. By decreasing carbohydrate portions and adding in some cruciferous vegetables one will slowly notice a difference in their energy level and the way they feel. The caffeine in energy drinks and coffee gives us a quick energy boost but has long term detrimental effects. The caffeine provides a short energy boost and also causes constriction of our arteries. This constriction decreases circulation to our extremities and our brain. The constriction to the arteries in our legs could lead to blood clots and the constriction of arteries in our brain causes headaches as the arteries open up as the caffeine wears off. To wean off our easy diet, select one item a month to eliminate. This could be eliminating a roll at dinner or a snack and energy drink in the afternoon.

Can you please share your “5 Non-Intuitive Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing”? (Please share a story or an example for each, and feel free to share ideas for mental, emotional and physical health.)

Strengthening your fascia, incorporating diet changes slowly, decreased caffeine and wearing Vive Wear socks are all simple changes that can improve an individuals health, energy, balance, strength, and mental acuity. You may have just accomplished a complete health makeover without even noticing it.

As an expert, this might be obvious to you, but I think it would be instructive to articulate this for the public. Aside from weight loss, what are 3 benefits of daily exercise? Can you explain?

Exercise is important to improve balance, coordinated strength of muscles and develop integrity of the fascial system ( Fasintegrity ).The fascia is the integrating structure that supports the muscles, skeleton and all organs of the body. The fascia connects all body structures and provides the tension to integrate diverse muscles groups to achieve functional movement. This coordinated strength helps develop balance, protect joints against stress, and develops athleticism.

This concept is the complete opposite of traditional strength training that focuses on strengthening one muscle group at a time. It’s like putting together Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome. If you just have a few beams put together the structure will not stand up, but once you have connected all the beams you have an incredibly strong structure. The beams of our body are the fascial system and if the fascia is not systemically integrated our body will not be able to withstand the stresses it’s subjected to. I have learned to avoid working a single muscle group on an exercise machine and start working on fascial strengthening which incorporates coordinated muscle strengthening. The earliest gains in fascial integration are improvement in balance and coordination, decreased tendonitis, and decreased sprains. In my opinion, fascial integration training is the new frontier of improving human performance and decreasing injury.

For someone who is looking to add exercise to their daily routine, which 3 exercises would you recommend that are absolutely critical?

The next step of strengthening is being able to incorporate these body weight strength activities without having to go to the gym. We are all busy with our day jobs and taking time to get to the gym, get dressed, exercise, shower and get home is just too much time. I recommend finding small openings in your daily routine to get in a few body weight activities a few minutes at a time. Some call this low stress exercise Greasing the Groove. By the end of the day you’ve accomplished a full exercise program without even breaking a sweat. During my surgery days, I use the few minutes between cases to squeeze in a few body weight activities. I don’t waste any time and sometimes I even get nurses in the operating room to join me in these balancing activities. Most activities are performed on the ball of one foot at a time with the toes gripping the floor. This will develop fascial strength. The activities include forward and reverse lunges, balancing like a starfish on one leg, balancing like a drinking bird, and pistol squats.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story?

A novel that I read 50 years ago is still relevant today. The Cancer Ward by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn is a novel that follows the pain, suffering and hope of patients in a Soviet cancer ward in 1955. The novel while accurately depicting the suffering of exiled cancer patients is symbolic of the lives of Russian citizens who have been exiled to work camps for their political criticism of the government. Through the patients incurable suffering they persevere through the suffering of the treatment with hope that there may be freedom from the disease and maybe freedom in their life. For the majority of citizens watching the suffering of a fellow man, what is their moral responsibility for the imprisonment and mistreatment of both patients and citizens? The novel provides insight into the ineffective use of poisons to treat cancer and the patients unwavering struggle for freedom in their life.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

The movement that I feel can have the biggest impact on peoples lives is fascial strengthening. Developing fascial strength improves the athleticism of amateur and professional athletes and minimizes injury and improves performance. For elderly people fascial strength will improve their balance and thus minimize the risk of fractures from falls. The improved fascial strength will decrease the stress across the joints and therefore decrease pain from arthritis. Fascial strengthening requires no equipment and can be done whenever you have a few minutes. You can even do it while brushing your teeth or getting out of the shower. The benefits take time but as you continue to advance the fascial strengthening you will notice a change in your activities of daily living. Personally when I walk now I notice a push off with my toes and a little spring in my step. When I participate in sports I have more energy with less effort and my toes instinctively are moving me forward with improved balance. The motion is subconscious and I don’t have to think about each effort. Of all the aerobic and strength training that I have performed, fascial strengthening has provided the biggest improvement.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

“Absorb what is useful, Discard what is not, add what is uniquely your own” — Bruce Lee

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this if we tag them 🙂

If asked who would be a mentor of mine, it would be Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee was a famous martial artist, actor, and philosopher who was born on November 27th, 1940 in Chinatown, San Francisco. He died of cerebral edema at age 33. Lee was someone who trained to develop fascial strength and was always trying to improve himself and others around him. One of his many famous quotes, “Absorb what is useful, Discard what is not, add what is uniquely your own”, is applicable today.

What is the best way our readers can follow you online?

https://vivewear.com/

https://www.instagram.com/vivewear/

https://www.facebook.com/vivewear

https://www.linkedin.com/company/vive-wear

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We wish you only continued success in your great work!


Dr. Marcus Duda: 5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Can Dramatically Improve Your Wellbeing was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Female Disruptors: Tray Kearney On The Three Things You Need To Shake Up Your Industry

Nobody owes you anything. If you want an opportunity sometimes you have to create the opportunity for yourself. I wanted to have a morning show. Did someone give me the opportunity yet? No, so I created my own morning show on my social media platforms. Have a great following and I am getting the message to the masses.

As a part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Tray Kearney.

Tray Kearney is an Author, Speaker, Certified Life/Relationship Coach and a servant leader whose assignment is helping others heal from matters of the heart. She is known for her method of helping others heal through her transparency and truth. Her testimony of going through the storm of infidelity on both sides of not only being the offender, but also the recipient of betrayal, gives men and women the safe haven they need to be transparent and honest with themselves without judgement.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory?” What led you to this particular career path?

I didn’t choose coaching, coaching chose me. Most of us get to our purpose through our tragedies of life and/or our traumas. I am no different from many. During a time in my life when I felt completely lost and distraught, I was trying to figure out who I was and where I was going in life. I was in a toxic and very dysfunctional relationship mainly because I was toxic and dysfunctional. A very good friend of mine who knew I was in a bad space introduced me to a prayer line called “Girlfriends Pray,” and on that call the founder Dr. Dee C. Marshall spoke about a group program called Life Camp. Life Camp is for women who desire a better life and who were looking for spiritual growth and personal development. I joined the program kicking and screaming and that’s where the journey began. To make a long story short, as I grew and became healthy mentally and spiritually I started to share my story of how I went from being a toxic, dysfunctional adulterer to being a healthy human being, women began to ask me how. Some even asked me to coach them. As the demand grew I decided to get certified and that is how I got here.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

Well, my niche is a little different than most coaches. You can say I am the infidelity coach. Some have called me the #NoSideChicking Queen. I deal with the big pink elephant in the room that no one wants to address. I remove men from the equation and hold women accountable for their part in infidelity. Whether it is the wife who stays with a cheater for whatever reason or the side chick who some may call the mistress is sleeping with someone’s significant other. I take away the excuses and ask them some real questions. Not to blame them, but to hold them accountable. Blame causes guilt, accountability causes growth. I have programs to help women reclaim their self-worth and honor their own value, which leads them to healthy lifestyles. I have a movement I started called #NoSideChicking where I challenge women to honor, guard and respect each other’s relationships. I refuse to be silent about this. We will not stick our heads in the sand any longer or allow our fate to be in the hands of men. I share this on many platforms as a speaker, which is a career that I didn’t choose but that has chosen me. It’s funny I didn’t choose to be an author either. Some things are just part of your destiny, and again, as a disruptor I speak about the big pink elephant in the room, CHEATING. I say what a lot of women want to say but only think.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

One of the funniest mistakes I made, hmmm this one is kind of hard because the topic is so heavy there aren’t too many funny stories. I had one of my first speaking engagements and I totally did not prepare for it. I thought speaking was speaking. I was just going to talk. The crowd was not at all engaged or impressed with me. I was mortified to say the least, but I got through it. Thinking about it now it was really funny. But at the time not so much. I learned that you must always be prepared. As a matter of fact, from that experience I am always over prepared.

We all need a little help along the journey. Who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

I always have to start with my Coach Dr. Dee C. Marshall; her program literally saved my life. She does an annual women’s retreat in PA she calls it the Mountain Top Experience. I went to the retreat and she did an exercise and challenged us to describe the 2020 version of ourselves which seemed crazy at the time because it was 2016, but the things we talked about on the mountain are my life right now. I am a 2x author, a certified life/relationship coach, and a sought- after speaker; back then it was just words on a piece of paper. Even though she would never take credit I am a better person because of her influence. I would also have to say my CORE. I have four friends of forty years who are more than friends they are mentors and have influenced me to be greater. Whether it was writing my book, getting my certifications, or speaking, I know I needed to continue to elevate to keep up with them. Nobody wants to be left behind. I’ve watched them get Master’s degrees in their forties, become heads of their departments, relocate, buy homes, have healthy happy marriages and so much more. They have mentored me not only through talks but through actions.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

It’s all in your motive. If you are disruptive for a positive change then it is “Good Trouble.” If you are being disruptive to be destructive at the cost of someone else that is not good. If being disruptive compromises your integrity to prove a point that is not being disruptive, its being destructive; there’s a big difference between the two. I’ll say it again, what’s the “motive” of the disruption? When you use the word disruptive is it for the greater good of a cause or the people? I am disrupting the coaching industry to eliminate the infidelity epidemic. A friend of mine is disrupting the PR industry by teaching a DIYPR Program to help those who can’t afford PR that is positive disruption or good trouble.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

  1. Nobody owes you anything. If you want an opportunity sometimes you have to create the opportunity for yourself. I wanted to have a morning show. Did someone give me the opportunity yet? No, so I created my own morning show on my social media platforms. Have a great following and I am getting the message to the masses.
  2. When you learn, teach and when you get, give. I’ve learned from all of the experiences in my life and have learned to use it as content and context for my programs to teach those who need guidance in those areas that I’ve learned in. Being able to work from home and create my own schedule has given me extra time to do things I enjoy. When I’m not working I give my time to one of my favorite non-profits, Nassan’s Place, which is a 501c3 organization that supports families affected by autism.
  3. Everybody does not deserve a front row seat in your life. I have learned to prioritize people the way they prioritize me. If I am in the balcony of their life I honor their request by placing them in the balcony of mine. I used to give people a seat they wouldn’t give me. I used to hold on to people who had let me go, now I simply accept their choice and I let them go. It’s all a matter of protecting one’s peace.

We are sure you aren’t done. How are you going to shake things up next?

For the month of March I am launching the #NoSideChicking pledge where I hope to get one million women by the end of 2021 to take the #NoSideChicking pledge to honor, guard and respect each other’s relationship. I want them to agree to become part of the infidelity solution instead of the problem. We will pledge to not disrupt each other’s relationships and homes. We will pledge that we will not knowingly entertain someone else’s significant other.

In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges faced by ‘women disruptors’ that aren’t typically faced by their male counterparts?

Basically, just getting passed the judgement. When we disrupt and “think outside the box” we are called trouble makers instead of trail blazers. I think that is the major challenge we face. However, we have never been afraid of a challenge.

Do you have a book/podcast/talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us?

A book that has had a great impact on my life truly is the Bible. I’ve been down some slippery slopes and some dark alleys on my journey and I often tell myself “You’ve had the best map in front of you the whole time. All you had to do was follow the ten commandments and you would have avoided so much.” However, I wouldn’t trade my life lessons for the world.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

The #NoSideChicking Movement. The antidote for infidelity.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote?” Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“This too shall pass.” It’s relevant every day. No matter how hard it gets. No matter what I’ve gone through and no matter what I go through. I can honestly tell myself Tray “This too shall pass.”

How can our readers follow you online?

www.traykearney.com Instagram/Twitter @TrayKearney

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!


Female Disruptors: Tray Kearney On The Three Things You Need To Shake Up Your Industry was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.